A new study from Dr. Frank Mitloehner’s lab at UC Davis looks at reducing enteric methane using essential oils

Whether or not you subscribe to the ability of essential oils to ease your stress, lighten your mood or give you a feeling of calm, it’s worth taking a look at how some of them are being used as feed additives that reduce greenhouse gas emissions of cattle. A team at University of California, Davis, under the leadership of Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., published a paper in October 2020, studying Agolin® Ruminant (AGO) and its ability to do just that. The Mitloehner Lab found an 11 percent reduction in methane intensity.

Methane, Cows, and Climate Change: California Dairy's Path to Climate Neutrality

UC Davis White Paper Re-Examines Methane’s Role in Climate Change, and How California Dairy Can Achieve Climate Neutrality

DAVIS, Calif., Sept. 2, 2020 – Researchers from the University of California, Davis are rethinking methane and showing that climate neutrality is within reach for the California dairy sector.

Burger King’s “breathe the farts of change” not passing the sniff test

Burger King has been adding lemongrass to cows’ diets in an attempt to cut down on cattle’s methane emissions. Given the greenhouse gas’ role in climate change, it’s a big deal. If nothing else, decreasing methane would buy us time to try and get a handle on carbon dioxide emissions, the No. 1 elephant in the room – and in the atmosphere.

What is a Dairy Digester and How Does it Affect Methane Emissions?

Dairies typically use lagoons to help manage manure from cattle. These lagoons produce methane, a greenhouse gas that affects our climate. In recent years, California dairies have been working with state agencies to implement new ways to manage manure and reduce the amount of methane being released into the atmosphere. One way is by using dairy digesters.